Buttermilk Pancakes

Everyone has a recipe for something that they claim is the best. It might be the best pumpkin soup, or the best roast potatoes, or the best chocolate cake. It’s usually a recipe for something that is well known, recreated often and stuffed up more often. It probably has a little tip or trick that may or may not work for everyone that tries the recipe. My ‘best’ recipe is for pancakes.

I’m not kidding when I say that everyone who tries these pancakes proclaims them to be the best ones they have ever tasted. They are quite thick pancakes, but also light and fluffy. They also don’t have that floury taste you often get with a basic pancake recipe. I think the addition of butter and sugar make them more cake-like, but in a good way – you can still cover them with as much maple syrup and icecream as you like, as they’re not too sweet on their own, but you could probably eat them on their own if you wanted to.

I guess there a couple of tricks to this recipe. The first is the buttermilk: it thickens the pancake mix so that when you put the batter into the frypan, it doesn’t spread out and become too thin (resulting in thin pancakes, which aren’t really my thing). Buttermilk is in the same section as ordinary milk in the supermarket, and despite its name, doesn’t actually contain butter. The second tip is the temperature of your hotplate: pancakes need to be cooked slowly, so they are evenly browned on the outside and cooked through on the inside. Hence you want your stovetop on low to medium heat; the worst thing you can do is crank the heat up too high, which would result in the middle of the pancake being raw. Sometimes it’s tempting to increase the heat because these pancakes take quite a while to cook (they’re no pancake shake, that’s for sure) but good things come from being patient!

A couple of other notes about the recipe – the original recipe only specified 500 mL of buttermilk, but I found this made the batter way too thick and difficult to work with, so I got into the habit of adding a little bit of extra ordinary milk to thin out the batter. The batter will still be thick enough to spread manually, but it will also spread a little bit by itself. I never actually measure the extra milk, as you might need more or less on each occasion, but it is approximately 1/4 cup. Another option is that if you’ve bought a 600mL carton of buttermilk, you can just use the entire thing and skip the ordinary milk entirely.

Secondly, I wouldn’t attempt these pancakes if you’re in a rush. I like to cook one pancake at a time and from preparation to consumption, the whole process takes over an hour. If you’re coordinated you could attempt to cook multiple smaller pancakes at a time in a larger frypan, or you could have two pans going at once, which would speed up the process.

Buttermilk pancakes, adapted from BBC Good Food Magazine (Australia) 

Ingredients

  • 45g butter
  • 2 cups/300g plain flour
  • 2.5 tsp baking powder
  • 0.5 tsp bicarb soda
  • 1/4 cup/55g white sugar
  • 2 cups/500mL buttermilk
  • approx 1/4 cup milk
  • 2 free range eggs
  • A little bit of butter, extra, for the pan
  • Maple syrup, jam, honey, strawberries and icecream to serve

Method

  1. Melt butter on stovetop or in microwave, cool.
  2. Sift together flour and raising agents. Stir in sugar.
  3. In a separate bowl whisk together milks and eggs. Make a well in the centre of the flour mixture and pour in the milk mixture. Whisk together gently until almost combined. Add butter and gently fold through. The mixture should still be a bit lumpy.
  4. Heat a little bit of butter in a heavy-based non-stick frying pan on low-medium heat (I preheat the stove on mark 4, then reduce to 3 when I’m ready to cook – my stove goes up to 9). Wipe out most of the excess butter with paper towel (you don’t want to shallow fry your pancakes).
  5. Once the pan is hot, pour 1/3 cup of batter into the pan. The batter will still be quite thick. Gently spread out mixture into a circle of about 15cm diameter with the back of a spoon or spatula. Once you have made a couple of pancakes you will be able to work out how thin you should spread your batter to get it the thickness you want – I like them thick, so I leave the batter thick, maybe half a centimetre in height.
  6. Cook the pancake for 3-4 minutes or until a few bubbles appear on the surface and pop. You can also use a spatula to have a little peek underneath the pancake; it’s ready to flip if it’s brown. If your pancakes are browning too much but not cooking, turn the heat down to low.
  7. Flip and cook for about a minute or two, increasing the heat slightly (I increase to mark 4). The pancake should puff up and be nice and fluffy. Repeat until all of the pancakes are finished.
  8. Serve with whatever you please. If you want to serve the pancakes all at once, you can keep them in a very low heat oven while the others are cooking. If you want to save them for later, put the pancakes on a wire rack to cool as you cook them (this stops them going soggy) and then store them in the fridge.

This recipe makes around 10 large pancakes, or more smaller ones. It really depends on how much batter you use per pancake. The original recipe stated it should serve 6 people, but I think it’s probably closer to 4.

So I guess you want photographic evidence that these pancakes actually are super yummy. I wish I could give it to you, but I am still awful at taking photos. You’ll have to look at this (awful) picture on instagram and trust me…

Until next time then! Let me know if these pancakes turned out as well for you as they do for me.

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